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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 535 (some duplicates have been removed)
if i'm a slow reader, but this is what stood out to me about jefferson. broadly put, philosophers think politicians maneuver. jefferson's genius was that he was both and he could do both often simultaneously such as the art of power. why did you want to look at thomas jefferson through the prism of how to wield power? >> because i think he sent us in the direction of his ideas and his intellectual achievements, his art, his architecture, with his tombstone. one of the great trivia questions in american history is what are the three things, author of the declaration of independence, founder of the university of virginia, that's what he wanted to be remembered for. and for 40 years, from 1769 when he was elected at age 25 to 1809 when he left right after james madison's inauguration right here as -- after being a two-term president of the united states, he had been in office or thinking about holding office. and so in a way jefferson's political career was hiding in plain sight. >> uh-huh. >> and so if even thomas jefferson, this great genius, this great architect of america spent his lif
. >> author jon meacham recounts the career of america's third president thomas jefferson. mr. jon meacham examines jefferson's relation to political power, reports that despite his strong belief and opposition to confrontation president jefferson was able to successfully lead the country in a highly partisan political environment. this is just under an hour. >> it is all downhill from there. my lawyer will take any complaints later. thank you so much and thank you for what you all do here. i have shopped here as a young washington monthly editor, shopped is too strong. we didn't have any money but you all may remember washington monthly editors were paid $10,000 a year which kate whoo-hoo won the national book award last night and adding to her amazing list of accomplishments, she used to say she actually graduated from the monthly when she could buy on tra appetizers in restaurants. i am a southerner, i am from tennessee, and i think understanding jefferson in his regional context and national context and political context is important. he was a master of politics, whether it was ideolog
to understanding the transformation in jefferson. when we think of france we think of sally and james having is, french food, jefferson getting to know french architecture and wine. even over there and very important national business he was there's trade representatives. we were desperate for money and a lot of money to the uso, enormous debts to britain and almost important export was a slave raised crops, tobacco. .. we were just waiting for opinions to greg. benefits is really true, but it was in our interest for him to say that. oddly enough, check presented up sort this radical feeling over there in france and before he left, he told thomas paine, williams short, another abolitionists over there going to get back to america, he was going to train slaves, settle them on land at sharecroppers and the certainty they would become good citizens and free people in the united states. but when he got back to the united states, things changed. he came back with his daughter, pat c. it turned out she needed a dowry because she met her husband, thomas mann randolph and they decided to get married in
a prolific author about andrew jackson now he's out with another best seller thomas jefferson. jon, thank you so much for coming on the show. walking contradiction is that an easy, quick way of summing up a man whose passions for personal liberty extended to obviously the contradiction as it relates to owning slaves, the issues of his own shyness and the pursuit of power and politician. i mean going through this, he seems to be everything to anyone who is searching for him to be like themselves. >> right. you know, one of the reasons why we're sitting here talking about him now. his capacity to speak to the best instincts and the worst in american life. there have been marvelous books rent by jefferson. we all look back in search of either inspiration or sanction. that's what happened with jefferson. one of the problems with jefferson was he was so eloquent and prolific for so long that you could quote him on any issue, the same thing with winston churchill and the bible. those are other examples. >> gavin: 60 years span of writing. someone who kept and saved all of his letters. because he kn
. >> is there any other public comment? >>> item seven b informational update on jefferson street. >> ladies and gentlemen i would like to introduce john thomas the department of public words works the department public works and has taken this on together with a number of port staff that will be supporting him so if you would like to. >> good afternoon commissioners director moyer and as al, leaves i would acknowledge that i worked with him before and it's a coincidence we had worked together judge and for me to be here and so i'm here to provide with you a brief update on the jefferson project and judge snow the project extends from jounce street to hide along jefferson and includes complete replacement of the sidewalks sidewalks and road way and the sides will remain 15 feet and an all knew 19-foot sidewalk will be added to the north side of the street this will result in had a twin road way and park parking is eliminated within those limits. in terms of where we are the bids were opened on october third in the to proceed was granted to bell man landscape and construction on december t
eastern on c-span2's booktv and sunday at 5:00 on american history tv on c-span3. >> from the jefferson library of monticello, historian henry -- henry wiencek talks about thomas jefferson's relationship to slavery. jefferson sought financial gain through the ownership and labor of his slaves but america's third president called silent profits. the dr. utilize recent archaeological findings at jefferson's estate, monticello and jefferson's papers in his research. this is just over an hour. >> our guest speaker this afternoon is henry wiencek who will be talking about his book "master of the mountain: thomas jefferson and his slaves". it is a subject the thomas jefferson foundation has been a pioneer in researching and presenting thanks largely to the work of senator stenson who collected essays published earlier this year by the university of virginia press. entitled labor for my happiness:slavery at thomas jefferson at monticello. regarded an authority on the subject. the book was released to coincide with an exhibit on slavery at monticello in the smithsonian national museum of africa
sky and i have been a street artist since 1974 most artists like the jefferson street made into a policewoman 98 and the widened sidewalks provide space for our three by 4-foot booth and is we used to have more than five spaces on the street but due to construction we have only about 15 left. even though most artists don't work there due to lack of spaces available we circulated a pigs this last weekend and over 225 artists signed it requesting that these few spaces remain part of our program i sent you a copy of this possession last week. the petition reads for most of those years we have had handmaid wears between hide and jones street and the construction project will begins in 2013 ask will revitalize the area and open a new pedestrian mall and we feel we add to the colorful ambiance of however we feel fear father fear our space may be limit and had so we petition you to give us the same number of spaces we have had and we have yet to hear a definitive yes that we will clueinged in the plan. on the port commission website under seven goals of the water front use lan
, sean hannity, david barton. i don't know if you're familiar with david barton, the jefferson lies, which was his most recent book. and a variety of similar works, but but those -- and then there were a number of works by politicians that i read. and this is always dangerous because politicians usually don't like their own books. but i figure they ought to at least be willing to agree with it so i read several recent books by newt gingrich on the judiciary. rick perry governor of texas has a fairly recent book called fed up. it's a states rights manifesto. so that collectively, some of the politicians on the far right and then that's conservative entertainment complex became the foundation. i probably read 30 or 40 books from that wide swath of opinion. >> host: would you expect anything more from propaganda and political leaders? in other words is this what we might expect when something as complicated as the historical event over 200 years ago is written about and talked about and people who are up for election? was this just an inevitable outgrowth of our part of the culture tha
barton, the jefferson lies, that is his most recent book and a variety of similar works. and then there were a number of works by politicians that i read, and this is always dangerous because politicians usually don't write their own books, but i figure they ought to at least be willing to agree with what is in them, so i read several recent books by new gingrich and there's a book called fed up that is a manifesto, some of the politicians on the right and that entertainment complex could be the foundation. that would be 30 or 40 books glenn beck, that a wide swath of opinion. >> host: would you expect anything more from the propaganda? in other words is this what we might expect when it is as complicated as over 200 years ago is written about and talked about the people that are up for reelection and trying to sell books is this just an inevitable outgrowth of the culture that talks about issues in this way? >> guest: to a large extent, yes and if you look historically at the discourse, it hasn't changed much over the last 200 years. this kind of very propaganda history
use of history, even while the district was being made, people were very propagandists. what jefferson before they were dead and what they meant. so yes, i do think that is part of the genre and it didn't part of the genre needs to be people like me writing correct is insane if this is where you're getting your history, it's wrong. if not wrong, at least much more complicated than inflate it to be. >> host: that make touchy about this point of being complicated. let's say they have copy editors who said that of the founders, they said many of the founders said something that most of the founders or was a common opinion at the time. with that simple change of phrasing be enough to satisfy you? or is there a deeper concern? >> guest: that would totally come in dominate the utility of what i call the founders send monster. >> guest: when i first decided to do this is just going to write a blog and so the founders timeclock, actually my first attempt to use photoshop took a picture of george washington, john adams and start them altogether and that was the founders signed monster, the grea
part of these acts against the british. webster is one of the early people and jefferson is probably the lead on this. he creates words with great abandon and he just loves to create words and chuck a jibe at the british with words. write a letter to john adams and says, our duty as americans -- he creates the word meola jives and jefferson is creating all these words. he created ottoman for the footstool. jefferson was the coiner or introducer, the first one to actually bring them into the mainstream and the list is really sort of fascinating. pedicure is his world. mono crowd is his word. the one that he does the most weight and becomes the most egregious is the word belittled. he creates the word a little. he knows what he's up to and he knows he's creating something is going to be very disturbing. noah webster loves the word and one of his teachers at yale writes in a letter about the word. the british hate the word to the extent that one scholar comes out with modern english usage, the first edition, dollar is still attacking the word it creates a sort of disturbed approach to t
people who did that and the early presidents and are all very much aware of this. jefferson probably is the lead in this. jefferson creates words with great, great abandoned. he just loves great words. he loves to sort of talk a -- at 1940, i'm sorry 1820. he writes a letter to john adams and he says our duty as americans is teen neologism he creates the word. jefferson him is creating all these words and some of them -- he creates the word ottoman. not for the empire but for the footstool. there are 114 words now and the oxford english dictionary which are credited to jefferson as a corner or the introducer and the first one to actually bring them into the mainstream. the list is really sort of fascinating. pedicure is his word. i'm sorry. mona craddock meaning a person who is in a single room. the one that he does the most with and becomes the most egregious with the purest and the language police is the word be little. he creates the word be little and he knows he is creating something that is going to be very disturbing and noah webster himself just loves the word. in fact he wan
people with this. and the early presidents and are all very much aware of this. jefferson probably is the lead on this. jefferson creates words with great, great abandon. he just loves to create words. he loves to sort of tuck a jibe at the british by creating words. 1840, much later, but he writes -- i'm sorry, 1820, he writes a letter to john adams, and he says, you know, our duty as americans is to neologize, to create new phrases. so jefferson creating all these words, and some of them are -- he creates the word ottoman. not for the empire, but for the foot stool. he creates -- there's just, there are 114 words now in the oxford english dictionary which are credited to jefferson either as the coiner or the introducer, the first one to actually bring them into the mainstream. and the list is really sort of fascinating. pedicure is his word. pussy -- i'm sorry, that's teddy roosevelt. monocrat meaning a person who believes in a single rule. the one he does probably the most with and becomes the most egregious to the purists and the language police is the word "belittle." he creat
, or the democratic republicans, who felt more than they were the party of the people. thomas jefferson was being inaugurated, and he did not want a lot of for the role with his inauguration. he stripped away a lot of the formalities built up under washington and adams. so, thomas jefferson is living in a boarding house across the street from the capital, about where the library of congress stands today, and when the time comes he just walks across the street, and he is just just fairly casually. he goes to the senate chamber to the senate chamber happened to be the largest chamber in the capital. the house with meeting in a room that is today occupied by a single senator, is to give you some sense of the portions, because the house wing had not been built yet. only the senate wing had been constructed. thomas jefferson went to this and he was sworn in by his political opponent, and also his vice president, aaron burr, who was also a political opponent. it must have been a tense inauguration. then, he delivered his inaugural address in a voice that was so low that most people in the room, and the
treasures is this flag from thomas jefferson's first inauguration in 1800. you can see, looking at this banner, what it says -- the eagle holds these ribbons, and on one it says t. jefferson, president of the united states, and on the other, john adams is no more. that celebration, the union and be out, -- the unit in the out, that is what we are looking for, the relationship. you can look at these inaugurations as touchstones along our national narrative of the changes that have taken place. some of them are technological. the question of george washington writing in a carriage, somebody else in a car, the introduction of radio, television and the internet to record these things -- there are different steps along the way to record, but a continuity -- a kind of reassuring continuity that is important for holidays. you know that thanksgiving in our houses like this. we serve mashed potatoes this way. we have our inaugurations this way. there is very much the same kind of spirit. i pulled a few simple things to give you a sense of the taste and feel of inaugurations. one aspect o
front tar race, 145 jefferson, place of entertainment. permit. >> are we skipping e? >> that is in richmond and they asked us to hold that until the end. >> order front terrace on jefferson street. this building houses the spaces available for rent for special events such as meetings, classes seminars, banquets and reunions. the entertainment might include djs or speakers. the area is primarily commercial, as such the letters granting this permit are from other commercial venues including the hotel, the best western hotel. fisherman's wharf and the blue and gold fleet which are all neighbors. >> good. >> good evening, commissioners, miem fiilip, i represent the wax museum at water front terraces and could i get this on? yes. >> we have a picture here of 145 jefferson street building. some of our tenant includes mcdonalds and pay less shoes and the wax museum opened in 1963 and we are celebrating our 50th year anniversary, it provides visitors with the unique experience to come face-to-face with celebrities, personalities. and we are open every day, holidays included
jefferson and we follow hamilton. the government does plenty here. by european standards, we have small government in the united states. >> we will probably carry on doing so. thank you for coming in. >> thank you. it was a book that jane austen described as her own darling child. "pride and prejudice" has grown up. the past decade have seen an explosion of sequels and spinoffs. it is something she never could have imagined. our editor reports on this enduring popularity of elizabeth bennet. >> a rare, up 200 year old first edition of "pride and prejudice" a novel about five unmarried sisters with the famous opening line. >> is a truth universally acknowledged that a single man in possession of good fortune must be in looking for a wide. >> jane austen and recalled her book "first impressions." >> you do not wish to dance with me? >> they can be inaccurate. and could lead people to jump to conclusions based on nothing more than pride and prejudice. >> i should be very happy to dance with you. >> this is jane austen's house. she was happy and productive here. every morning to come downst
that seemed unwinnable, or for lack of preparedness. jefferson, truman, johnson and bush were the four. also, for failed because of economic crisis for failure to act to deter such a crisis. these were jefferson, cleveland, coolidge, franklin roosevelt from the 37 downturn, and george bush. at failed due to their inability to lead congress were jefferson, monroe, grants, wilson, truman, johnson, nixon and bush. to failed due to hubris, franklin roosevelt, and richard nixon are the four who did not effectively communicate their agendas or initiatives were jefferson, monroe, grant in cleveland. obviously, the dominant source of failure for second term presidents has been their inability to successfully work with congress. fully at second term presidents have faced trouble or failed second terms due to record to the fight between congress and the white house. having a congressional majority of their own party is no assurance of relief. those presidents who served with congress having a majority of the opposing party during their second term included wilson, eisenhower, nixon, reagan and clinton
for those failed for a troubled second term. for failed because of a water seems on unwinnable. jefferson, truman, johnson and bush were the foyer. also for a failed because of the economic crisis for failure to act and deter such a crises. these are jefferson, cleveland, coolidge, franklin roosevelt's and george bush. it failed due to their inability to lead congress for jefferson, monroe, grant, well some, truman, johnson, nixon and bush. franklin roosevelt and richard nixon. for he did not affect the philly communicate their agendas or initiatives for jefferson, monroe, grant in cleveland. obviously failure for second term president has been their inability to successfully work with congress. only 82nd term presidents have failed second terms to directly to the fight between congress and the white house. i've been a majority of their own party of relief. those presidents who served in the congress have a majority of the opposing party during his second term included wilson, eisenhower, nixon, reagan and clinton. the competitive battle between the president and congress, over the treaty
's plans twice and made her this week's jefferson award winner. the stage as peter pan. and both changed the life >>> one man is a fan of the opera the other took the stage as peter pan and both changed the life of this week's jefferson award winner. as sharon chin shows us, she is now helping young hearts fly. [ music ] >>> reporter: dozens of kids shine on the stage inspired by leslie noel. >> happiness can be this wonderful contagious thing. >> we're going to try something new ♪ [ music ]♪ >> reporter: leslie's students share the magic of music through her peter pan foundation in lafayette. it started with her own real- life drama. at age 16 she met her hero frank frank, the longest running "phantom of the opera." he introduced her to his voice teacher, who invited her to be his student in italy. >> this is the moment all my dreams tomorrow true. -- all my dreams come true. >> reporter: but at 17 she suffered from a rare nervous system disorder that paralyzed half her face and body. she said her determination helped her get well. >> i'm going
an expense every meal for two, could you feed 50 people with it? coming up how a jefferson award winner does it every week. >> and they may struggle in social situations making it hard for adults with autism keep a job. up next the company offering training for high paying careers. ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,, here's a pretty incredible story.. >>> santa rosa 27 degrees this morning! it was low. >> we are going to get back there again tonight. we are going to see very similar temperatures around the bay area. so yeah, we're kind of thawing out now and looking good into the afternoon although very hazy as you look across our skies toward san francisco. we are going to see the temperatures running up mainly in the 50s today. it looks like pretty seasonal and then tonight again it's going to be cold and we have some big changes coming for the weekend. maybe a couple of raindrops headed our way. looking toward the bay bridge, not too bad as we head throughout the afternoon. a 48-degree temperature in concord, still cool. 50 oakland. 48 santa rosa. 51 san jose. high pressure holding on for another day brin
reporter sharon chin went to the shoreline to meet this week's jefferson award winner. >>> reporter: along san francisco bay you can hear birds chirp, kites suffer and enjoy the waves because of 96- year-old sylvia mclaughlin. >> i think it's just beautiful. >> reporter: she spent more than 50 years leading the charge to protect the bay. >> it's very gratifying to me to see so many people enjoying our beautiful bay. >> reporter: to guard the bay against sprawl and pollution, sylvia cofounded save the bay in 1961 with two friends. today she is the last survivor the pioneering trio. david lewis save the bay's executive director. >> the fact that we still have a bay today is due in large part to sylvia's leadership in a time when there weren't environmental leaders and there certainly weren't women leading that kind of an effort. >> reporter: sylvia and her friends' first victory was to stop berkeley's plan to double the size of the city by filling 2,000 acres of the bay. >> we didn't want to see anything as beautiful as our bay being filled in. >> re
an east bay charity. you're going to meet this week's jefferson award winner. coming up. >> hi, i'm meteorologist lawrence karnow in the cbs 5 weather center. low pressure continuing to rotate off the coastline and spinning some showers in our direction. we'll talk more about that coming up. >> and have you sent us your 9ers super fan photos yet? this is a little 9er pride. we want to see your red and gold pride as well so keep them coming to news@kpix.com or cbssf.com. (woman) 3 days of walking to give a breast cancer survivor a lifetime-- that's definitely a fair trade. it was such a beautiful experience. (jessica lee) ♪ and it's beautiful ♪ (woman) why walk 60 miles in the boldest breast cancer event in history? because your efforts help komen serve millions of women and men facing breast cancer every year. visit the3day.org to register or to request more information today. it was 3 days of pure joy. ♪ and it's beautiful ♪ super bowl...the niners are counting down.. and so are we!! >>> we are exactly 10 days, three hours and 19 minutes an
. we'll be right back. >>> it's so quiet! richard jefferson, the veteran can still get up...the reverse dunk...jefferson 1 >>> stephen curry back in the warriors lineup. jefferson, the veteran can still get up. the reverse dunk. the warriors led by as many as 16. but the hornets made a second- half push and took the lead. down to 35 seconds remaining. the warriors snap their three- game losing streak. 116-112, the final. >>> david shaw. second half. cobbs brings them within a point on the floater. but that's as close as the bears would get. picked off by chasson randle. stanford knocks off their rival. they're now 2-and-3 in pac 12 play. >>> st. marys visiting portland. the gaels led all night. second half, portland shot 23% on the night. gaels win 60-38 and are now 4- and-1 in conference. >>> usf hosting loyola. second half, usf pulls away. tolleson spotting up from beyond the arc. they beat lmu. >>> butler with the steal. >> i can't believe it! i can't believe it! >> jones with the buzzer beater. butler upsets no. 8 gonzaga. >>>
memorial to our former president thomas jefferson. how gorgeous it is. they spent a lot of time renovating and refurbishing it and it's worth the wait. >>> january 21. >> thanks so much for joining us. she's andrea roane. i'm mike hydeck. we're coming to you live from northwest d.c. our vantage point is stunning. we're overlooking the white house as things get under way bright and early. i bet the staff is ready to go. >> the staff is probably ready to go but the lights are still not on. i guess the first family are getting a few more winks as they're going to have a very, very busy day today. they had a busy one yesterday. both. obama and vice president biden have been sworn in, in their second term in office. >> we'll be here all morning, both monika samtani and howard are back in the studio with your weather and traffic first. we begin with howard with today's frigid temperatures. not going to be one of the coldest inauguration days but it's pretty cold out here now. >> temperatures in the mid-30s. watch it climb into the 40s. average inauguration temperature is really about 37 degrees
. jefferson blocked the shot. heads for the hills. jefferson draws the foul. turns it into a three-point play. trailing by 7. then stephen curry heats up they win 106-99. and that is sports. >> all right. thank you, feds. >> you bet. -- thank you, fred. >> you bet. >> that will do it for us tonight. we will see you tonight at 10:00 p.m. >> good night. look at you guys with your fancy-schmancy u-verse high speed internet. you know, in my day you couldn't just start streaming six ways to sunday. you'd get knocked off. and sometimes, it took a minute to download a song. that's sixty seconds, for crying out loud. we know how long a minute is! sitting, waiting for an album to download. i still have back problems.
to be changing. we return now to my interview with her today in the jefferson room at the state department. as she exits the public stage, for now, anyway, secretary of state hillary clinton is basking in an approval rating of 66%, a lifetime high. but that's not to say she's without her critics. among other things, the administration's handling of the ongoing blood bath in syria remains highly controversial. >> and it's time for assad to get out of the way. the united states believes that president assad should step away. the world will not waiver. assad must go. >> you repeatedly said that president assad needs to go. >> right. >> starting two years ago. >> right. >> and yet, 60,000 syrians are dead and he is still in office. >> right. >> what does it take for america to intervene? >> well, i think we have been very actively involved. until recently, there was no credible opposition coalition, and i cannot stress strongly enough how important that is. you cannot even attempt a political solution if you don't have a recognized force to counter the assad regime. >> secretary panetta recent
. >> thank you, lawrence. >>> well, every thursday we tell you about a local jefferson award winner. >> today, you'll see dozens of them, as sharon chen takes us to the 2012 medal ceremony. [ applause ] >> reporter: hundreds of people crowded into the herb theater in san francisco to pay tribute to the year's regional jefferson award winners, including the organization's cofounder, sam beard. >> the 50 people we're honoring here tonight, you are award winners, and so is sandra day o'connor. you're more important than the top national winners, because if we ever lost the spirit of volunteering, we would be a whole different country. >> reporter: five winners accepted special silver medals. their names will be recommended for national recognition. oakland's ora lee brown was honored for keeping her promise to oakland school children to fund their college educations. she told the audience her next goal is to open a boarding school for underprivileged kids. >> 95 to 98% of the students will graduate because any kid that is not in the classroom, mama b
with thomas jefferson's ideal of rightful liberty. >> jon: thomas jefferson's rightful ideal of liberty. i believe we have a clip of him explaining that. >> law is the tyrant's will and always so when it violates the rights of individual. [ laughter ] >> jon: so what would this look like? >> they would build a huge perimeter around the whole thing, several smaller perimeters, turrets and towers. they say that they may find living within the community is incatible with their existing idea yoj. >> jon: really less of a jeffersonian iew toap why and freedom panic room. not sure it's the option for the return to lib ber tism somebody has to show the lib ranlz progressive what's real freedom looks like. any taker? >> what i do is stand for those willing to risk their lives for man's freedom, man's liberty so they can pursue happy yns. >> jon: you sir, there in the beautiful jacket with matching hints of emotional fragility, that's glenn beck, the guy who loves freedom too much. [ laughter ] he doesn't even have a tv show anymore. he lives on the internet where laws have no meanings and cats can
. you have a two good back-ups. and let's take thomas jefferson, because the presidents who have done this in the past are ronald reagan, franklin roosevelt, abe lincoln and thomas jefferson. thomas jefferson hands off power to his secretary of state james madison. so, both secretaries of state historically and vice presidents have been plausible successors. >> you know, in your advice to the president to make sure his second term is a success and not a failure, like we have said, appoint a successor, you also say to go big with things like immigration reform. you tell him to campaign aggressively in 2014. unlike in 2010 against republicans. all of which you think might help but wouldn't lowering unemployment, bringing the economy to full recovery, balancing a budget, wouldn't all of this also help assure a great second term? what am i missing here? >> nothing. the best politics is a good policy. >> right. >> barack obama, of course, believes that his -- that immigration reform is actually good policy. it will help actually bring down the deficit if we can get a bunch of high achievin
jefferson's worst nightmare. patrolling a remote area of afghanistan. taking on enemy fire and a comrade goes down. >> he's bleeding right here, i want you to put pressure on his wound. >> jefferson has been training for this moment for months. >> get him out of here. >> within minutes, the injured airman is bandaged up and moved out of harm's way. this is in afghanistan, it soon will be for jefferson. they're at moody air force base in south georgia. >> in a matter of weeks they'll be on the front lines of battle in afghanistan. >> runner, runner, runner. >> they're ready. >> i really felt like the warrior medic i've seen in the movies. >> her squadron is called out, jefferson and the other women of her group will fight alongside the men. >> the females, you know, we do everything the men do, sometimes even better. >> they're members of the 820th based defense group, from air assault to ground combat. the group does it all. and that includes the women. they're medics, intelligence officers, police officers. their current mission? >> to be a first in combat ready group. >> unlike the res
from the bay area jefferson award winners who have been recommended for national honors. >>> and beyond that facebook like button, the search tool that is making facebook useful. an expert from cnet.com joining us live in the studios next. a jefferson award winner. today - you're goi >>> every weekend we tell you about a jefferson award winner and today you'll see dozens of them as cbs5 reporter sharon chin shows you that all the 2010 winners got together this week for the annual medal ceremony. hundreds of people crowded into san francisco to pay tribute to the year's regional jefferson award winners, including the organization's co-founder sam beard. >> the 50 people honored here tonight, you are just award winners. and so is everyone else. you're more important to the top national winners. if we ever lost the spirit of volunteering, it'd be a whole different story. >>> five winners accepted the special silver medal. their names will be recommended for the national recognition. oakland's was keeping her promise to oakland's school
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 535 (some duplicates have been removed)

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